You are Here » News Chat » Is SuperSize Me a Con?
News Chat
June 9, 2004
7

Is SuperSize Me a Con?

— Posted by John Campea

According to THIS website, the details laid out in the now popular film Supersize Me may not be accurate.

Is this a conspiracy theory of “valid testimonies” to discredit the now tubby film subject?? Consider also that Spurlock once ran a short lived TV series called “I Bet You Will,” which paid contestants money to performing disgusting culinary acts like eating live cockroaches.

An interesting article at Tech Central Station sure makes me wonder.

In a nutshell “He sends a terrible message to America: Obesity is not your responsibility. It’s the fault of greedy corporations….Spurlock believes that moviegoers are dumb enough to think that it’s McDonald’s that made him fat — rather than the amount of food he consumed and his slothful habits.”

Maybe its the “slothful habits” that were under attack by this documentary, not McDonald’s fatty foods.

Not saying this film is a total scam, but there is some controversy.

This post was written by :

who has written 6785 posts on The Movie Blog

visit author's website | Contact the Author

  • http://www.culturesnob.com Culture Snob

    Although I’d like to take credit for finding the Filmforce article, I learned of it from Lying Media Bastards: http://www.lyingmediabastards.com.

  • Tom Whitaker

    I think any suggestion that the film suggests we dispense with personal responsibility is utterly ludicrous. It’s a clear example, to me at least, of the dangers of not resisting the temptation to eat there… sure, he digs at their marketing, but only in the way it influences our own decision making. It certainly made me make a few changes, and I’m usually accused of the kind of politics and outlook on life that absolves me of blame..

  • Will Fargo

    “SuperSize Me” is an editorial documentary. It’s sort of an opinion piece. Extreme actions will always get American’s attention. We can be “warned” about terrorist attacks, but until we see two jumbo jets crash into buildings, it doesn’t seem to be important.

    I don’t think Spurlock made this movie to make massive amounts of money, however, the people who have responded to it seem to want to make money. True, what Culture Snob said, everybody has an agenda. But why can’t we listen what people have to say before we begin the process of sharpening our impaling spears?

    However, damn good article!

  • Bubba

    Man, nice find on that Filmforce article … I’d never have known TCS gets money from Mickey D’s otherwise … but does Spurlock ever come off horribly in that interview transcript. You’d think people who make confrontational documentaries would be prepared for this sort of thing but apparently not …

  • tracy

    this is all quite interesting… while reading the glassman articles, the first thought that went through my head was “so what’s in this for him?” and of course, he has his own agenda just as spurlock does.

    i’m gonna wait and see how this turns out; the interview with spurlock did raise some suspicions, but so does that ign article. i wonder who’s making the most money off of this, and if mcdonalds will sue for defamation…

  • http://www.radzone.org/bclark/ Brian Clark

    Exactly, Culture Snob … TCS is “Where Free Markets Meet Technology”, so at least they are clearly wearing their lens on the world on their masthead. Morgan was pretty clear from his earliest press relations that film touches as much upon “personal responsibility” as Micky D not making the healthiest food. Controversy (and fiercely divided opinions) is a good sign when a doc has hit the pulse of public consciousness.

    Good find, though, with TCS … interesting reads even if I disagree with many of their free market posits.

  • http://www.culturesnob.com Culture Snob
Around the Web
"The stuff that dreams are made of."

— Humphrey Bogart as Sam Spade from The Maltese Falcon, 1941

    Archives