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March 29, 2014
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Bad Words is Filled with Laughter and a Surprisingly Interesting Plot

— Posted by Ryan

Genre: Comedy Directed by:  Jason BatemanStarring: Jason Bateman, Kathryn Hahn, Allison Janney Written by: Andrew Dodge (screenplay)

Genre: Comedy
Directed by: Jason Bateman
Starring: Jason Bateman, Kathryn Hahn, Allison Janney
Written by: Andrew Dodge (screenplay)


 
Synopsis: A spelling bee loser sets out to exact revenge by finding a loophole and attempting to win as an adult.
 

 

What can I say about Bad Words that isn’t already said in its title? Well, besides the crude humor that’s apparent in the trailer, the film actually contains many interesting characters and an ongoing mystery that keeps you captivated throughout the film.

 

Placing a crude man in an environment surrounded by innocence has been done before, but Bad Words manages to maintain the level of humor while also developing an intriguing story. Between the laughs, there are a number of inquisitive moments regarding Guy Trilby’s (Bateman) motives for competing in a children’s spelling bee. While those motives may be revealed to some as simplistic, the steady piecewise method of revelation are what maintains the interest throughout the film.

Bateman's crude behavior catches you off guard

Bateman’s crude behavior catches you off guard

Along the path of discovering more about Guy Trilby, we are introduced to his unlikely counterpart Chaitanya (Rohan Chand). Chaitanya is a relentless but innocent young boy who is intrigued by Guy and continuously pursues his friendship. Their onscreen chemistry is strong and Chand’s character is equally as entertaining as Bateman’s. While Bateman gives a strong performance, Rohan Chand is absolutely flawless in his role. It was such a delightful surprise to see a small child like Chand have a breakthrough performance in an adult comedic role. His childlike innocence is abruptly corrupted by his curiosity of Trilby. That curiosity leads to troublesome behavior and moments of laughable exchanged vulgarities.

Rohan Chand is the PERFECT counterpart to Bateman

Rohan Chand is the PERFECT counterpart to Bateman

Jenny Widgeon (Kathryn Hahn) is a character standing on the sidelines in the midst of Guy and Chaitanya’s story. Her character has her own moments of outrageous humor but her character serves the purpose of filling the plot rather than developing her character. Hahn plays a reporter that is covering Guy’s story. Her role as a reporter helps lubricate the dialogue during which the main character’s mystery is uncovered. She also assists Guy in his quest through her connections and acts as spontaneous yet hilarious love interest.

Bateman and Hahn's relationship is malevolently symbiotic

Bateman and Hahn’s relationship is malevolently symbiotic

Overall I would say this film is an achievement for Jason Bateman’s directorial debut. Is it a masterpiece, no, but it is sure to make you laugh on shock value alone. I found the plot to be surprisingly interesting being that the film was so focused on comedy. It was an added bonus and a rarity amongst many comedies such as this one. This may not be a film that you rush to see in theaters, but I would recommend that you do. If anything is worth the price of theater admission, I would say that a genuinely good laugh is worth both your money and your time.


Bad Words – 8 out of 10

A laugh out loud comedy with an intriguing plot…

This post was written by :

who has written 308 posts on The Movie Blog

First and foremost, Ryan Brown is a fan. He has been an avid fan of both the theater and cinema since an early age and his passion for both has been continually growing ever since. When dissecting a film, he focuses on all elements of film-making including some fan/cult factors. He believes that character development is the foundation of a good film and usually starts his analysis of a film from there moving forward. His writing style may be influenced by his background of narrative and argumentative studies in the subject, but he tends to enjoy a more conversational style to better interact with the readers, unlike some other pretentious and pompous writers.

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